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Prom Tops the List of School Functions Parents Are Most Concerned About Teens Drinking Alcohol

Mothers Against Drunk Driving

Today, MADD hosted its PowerTalk 21® press conference in Washington, DC with the National Alcohol and Beverage Control Association and Nationwide to release new parent survey data, which shows that parents are concerned about teen drinking during special occasions such as prom. Teen drunk and drugged driving victim, Kashira Brooks and her son spoke. Leading underage drinking researcher Dr. Robert Turrisi from Penn State also presented.

(Press Conference begins at 15:00)

Read the press release MADD distributed after the press conference with more in-depth information.


Giving the Shirt Off His Back

Leroy, who lives in Arizona, is the brother of a MADD Bay Area San Francisco volunteer. Leroy recently fell and broke his hip and is currently in rehab. He’s a long-time supporter of MADD Bay Area Walks, and he treasurers wearing his many Walk T-shirts.


Leroy was wearing one of his MADD T-shirts yesterday when a wheelchair-bound patient at the rehab facility asked him about the shirt. This disabled fellow has been living in this rehab facility for the past 9 years after being struck by a drunk driver.  Leroy offered him his MADD T-shirt, literally “giving him the shirt off his back”.


Though we can see that the fellow struggles, we were moved by his “thumb’s up” attitude as he proudly donned his new shirt. He has difficulty speaking, but was able to say “Good Deal!” as he was putting his thumb up.


We just never know how many people we’re reaching… even thousands of miles away.


Thank you for supporting ignition interlocks

Thank you to everyone who gave in support of securing the lifesaving power of in-care breathalyzers across the country.

In-car breathalyzers, or ignition interlocks, prevented 955 drunk driving attempts every TEN minutes in the last year – and, thanks to you, they will continue to make our roads and highways safer.

Thanks to generous donors, we have the ability and opportunity to press hard in the 22 remaining states without this lifesaving protection.

You are making headlines like this...

and this...

and especially this...

For 2017, we’ve hit the ground running. We’ve been working hard in Florida to pass an all-offender ignition interlock law. We are working in Massachusetts and Wisconsin, too.

Today, we have this protection in 28 states and the District of Columbia. I personally thank you for this compassionate, lifesaving gift, and I pledge to maximize the good it can do so that others don't experience the devastation caused by this 100% preventable crime.

Once more, thank you to everyone who joined in supporting our efforts.


Voices of Victims: The Story of Cody Dewitt

When Cathy Dewitt, Cody’s mom, visualized her oldest son’s high school graduation she dreamed a time of joy, celebration, and planning ahead for the next stage of his life. Cathy was excited about the numerous possibilities for Cody; she never imagined that she would sit next to an empty chair covered with flowers and an unworn cap and gown.

Cody was a few months shy of graduation, and beginning the next chapter of his life. He had done the hard work—completed homework, paid attention in class, participated in projects and earned his degree. Yet due to someone’s choice to drink and drive, Cody did not live to see the fulfillment of all of his hard work and plans.

On December 24, 2011, Cody hugged his mother goodbye. He went to a friend’s house to enjoy the last of his winter break. Cody and his friends hung out in the friend’s garage and drank alcohol until 1:15 AM, when they were asked to leave. Cody was riding in a passenger seat when the driver lost control of the car and hit a tree. Less than a mile away from home, the impact of the crash killed Cody instantly.

Cathy describes the next year of her life as a blur.  She shares few memories of the day that she learned her son was killed. She remembers Cody’s friends at her door telling her that he had been in a crash. She remembers arriving at the scene of a blocked off road and seeing the word “coroner” on the side of the vehicle. She remembers feelings of shock and haze, being physically present but mentally and emotionally absent.  That shock stayed with her for an entire year, “I don’t remember the first year after the crash, by the second year I started to realize that the crash did happen, and by the third year I started to grieve”.

Cody was a country boy at heart. He loved cutting wood, hunting, camping, fishing and being outdoors. “He was so active and always had to be doing something. As soon as he turned 16 he got a job to help me out.” Cathy, Cody, and Ben (Cathy’s youngest son) were a team. Together they were one. They did everything with each other and for each other. Cathy recalls a conversation with Cody days before the crash, “he told me that he wanted to have fun for a little bit before he had to grow up.”

A night of fun and someone’s choice to drink and drive changed many lives forever. Cody died, the driver was sentenced to six years in prison, Ben lost his best friend and big brother, Cody’s girlfriend lost her first love, and Cathy struggles to live the rest of her life without her son.

Their stories are examples of the devastating consequences of drinking and driving. Cathy believes that this is a community problem for which we are all responsible to prevent. “It affects more people than you’ll ever know, EMT, hospital staff, bystanders, neighbors, friends, everyone”. Cathy wants young people to think of how many lives they touch every day. She shares her story in hopes that she can prevent others from experiencing the grief that she lives with daily. Cathy now volunteers as a speaker at Victim Impact Panels and is committed to help MADD fight for its mission of No More Victims®. Drinking and driving is a 100 percent preventable crime, but even one life lost due to underage drinking is unacceptable. There needs to be zero tolerance for underage drinking considering two out of three underage drinking deaths do not even involve a motor vehicle.

MADD encourages parents talk to their children about the dangers of underage drinking. Kids who start drinking young are seven times more likely to be in an alcohol-related crash. MADD believes by taking proactive steps to protect our loved ones, especially our children, we can achieve a future of No More Victims®.


David Weinstein: Why We Walk

MADD honors David Weinstein and recognizes his loved ones who began our St. Louis Walk Like MADD. His story will live on. Watch the video:

Walk Like MADD from Ciderfly Studio on Vimeo.


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