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MADD

Founded by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving® (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to protect families from drunk driving and underage drinking. With the help of those who want a safer future, MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving® will end this danger on America’s roads. PowerTalk 21™ is the national day for parents to talk with their kids about alcohol, using the proven strategies of Power of Parents, It’s Your Influence™ to reduce the risk of underage drinking. And as one of the largest victim services organizations in the U.S., MADD also supports drunk driving victims and survivors at no charge, serving one person every 10 minutes at 1-877-MADD-HELP.

Together, these programs ensure that MADD achieves its lifesaving mission.


MADD’s response to the NFL’s conditional reinstatement of Dallas Cowboys’ Josh Brent
By | September 2, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

The Josh Brent situation is a painful reminder of how drunk driving can tear people’s lives apart. We wish so many things could have been different. We wish that Josh Brent would have made a different choice that night and never got behind the wheel of a car after drinking. We wish the criminal justice system in Texas would have sent a stronger message that drunk driving is unacceptable.

Above all, we wish Jerry Brown was alive today, playing football and being a dad. Sadly, victims and survivors pay the ultimate price and are given a lifetime sentence, despite the fact that drunk driving crashes are 100% preventable every time.

We acknowledge the NFL’s conditional reinstatement, but the focus needs to be on what does Josh Brent do with his second chance?

We advocate for immediate suspension and potential banishment from the NFL if Josh Brent violates the NFL’s conditions, especially any adverse involvement with law enforcement and/or prohibited alcohol-related conduct, and all sentencing mandates handed down by the criminal court. 

Instead of looking back MADD wants to look toward the future and how these tragedies can be prevented. That’s why we are more resolved than ever to work with the NFL to educate players, fans and entire communities that behind the statistics real people are needlessly killed and injured every day.

On behalf of the tens of thousands of victims and survivors we serve freely each year, MADD urges everyone to plan ahead if your plans include alcohol. Make the only choice to designate a non-drinking driver to keep the roadways and your loved ones safe.


Why We’re Here: Michael Collins
By | September 2, 2014 | Filed in: Victim Stories

On March 28, 2014, 22-year-old Michael Collins spent the evening out with friends at a spring formal near campus – he was just weeks away from graduating with a degree in exercise science from Illinois State University. 

In the early hours of March 29th, Michael and his friends were picked up by a designated driver and were on their way home, when a drunk driver ran a red light and struck the vehicle Michael was riding in. Michael sustained severe head trauma and was rushed into emergency brain surgery. After four days of fighting for his life, Michael succumbed to his injuries on April 2nd.

The drunk driver had a BAC of 0.1777 percent – more than twice the legal limit. She recently pled guilty to two counts of aggravated driving under the influence.

Michael was an active member of the Illinois State community and is remembered as a bright and witty friend by those who knew him. He was a natural leader with a propensity for doing the right thing. Michael also assisted his father, Jim, in coaching baseball at University High School.
Although his parents were not aware, Michael had signed up to be an organ donor and his organs and tissue went on to help as many as 200 people.

This past June, Michael’s friends and family formed at team at a Walk Like MADD event in Homer Glen, Illinois.  The team called #MCstrong raised more than $4,500 for MADD Illinois.


Click here to read more about Michael on his tribute page, or make a donation in his honor.


Help at Your Fingertips
By | August 27, 2014 | Filed in: Victim Services

Originally featured in the 2014 summer edition of MADDvocate®.


Many survivors of drunk and drugged driving crashes, as well as loved ones of those who’ve died, feel lost and helpless after the crash. While friends and family members are often available in the days immediately surrounding the tragedy, finding a support system that lasts a lifetime can be difficult. That is why MADD’s Victim Services are so vital.

Thanks to the explosion of the Internet and social media, getting these tools is easier than ever. Here are just a few of the avenues that victims can use to connect to other victims, honor loved ones and find much-needed resources:

Tributes

On MADD’s tribute page, victims and survivors can post pictures and memories of their loved ones and read about others with similar stories. Participants can even raise money in the name of a loved one if they choose.

Facebook

For years, victims and survivors relied on finding face-to-face support groups and other in-person meetings to connect with others experiencing similar emotions. However, due to location or the demands of busy schedules, these groups weren’t always accessible. The MADD Victim Services Facebook page gives victims and survivors the chance to engage with other victims, ask questions, provide comfort to others or read other victims’ stories.

Virtual Candlelight Vigil

Every holiday season, MADD hosts an online event where friends and relatives of victims and survivors have the opportunity to post something in memory or in honor of a loved one and light a virtual candle. This annual event provides an outlet for emotions during a tough time of year.

Support Materials

MADD offers a wide array of support materials on a number of different topics related to drunk and drugged driving victimization. Whether a victim/survivor needs help navigating the criminal justice system or just wants to know whether what they are feeling is normal, these brochures and workbooks can be downloaded at no charge from any computer.


If you still can’t find what you need online, call MADD ’s National Victim Services Help Line at 1-877-MADD -HELP (877-623-3435), toll free.


Celebrate Safely this Labor Day
By | August 26, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

Labor Day is celebrated by many Americans as the symbolic end of summer. With back to school and fall just around the corner, many families take advantage of this long summer weekend and head out on a last summer vacation or a day trip to the beach, pool or lake.

But holidays like Labor Day can be an especially dangerous time on America’s roadways. In 2012, there were 147 people killed in drunk driving crashes over Labor Day weekend. To put that into perspective, throughout the year someone is killed in a drunk driving crash every 51 minutes, on average. Over the Labor Day weekend, that statistic jumps to one every 34 minutes.

Thankfully, law enforcement will be out in force ready to arrest drunk drivers who put lives at risk from August 15 through September 1, covering the end of summer and the busy Labor Day holiday weekend.

Research shows that these campaigns result in a 20-percent decrease in drunk driving deaths. With one person, on average, dying every 34 minutes in a drunk-driving crash over Labor Day weekend, that’s a lot of lives that could be saved!

There are several ways you can help keep your loved ones safe this Labor Day holiday:

If you plan to be on the road during this dangerous time period, please be careful, and remember to spread the word that driving after drinking is simply not worth the risk … so don’t take the chance. 


Share this image to remind everyone to drive safe and sober this Labor Day Holiday:


 

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Please Support Alisa’s Law
By | August 21, 2014 | Filed in: Drugged Driving

So far, thousands of MADD supporters have contacted their legislators in support of Alisa’s Law. We’ve helped show Congresswoman Lowey that as she fights for Alisa’s Law, she has us fighting by her side. If you haven’t emailed your legislator yet, you can do that here.

Together, we’ve changed the culture on drunk driving. In 2006, New Mexico was the only state to require all convicted drunk drivers to use an ignition interlock. Today, thanks to you and MADD supporters like you, almost half of all states have passed similar laws.

But we need to keep the fight going to get the other 26 states to pass this lifesaving legislation so that convicted drunk drivers can’t continue to endanger innocent lives.

With your support, this new legislation that bears Alisa’s name can protect another daughter, son, mother, father, sister, or brother from sharing her fate. Please make your urgent tax-deductible contribution today.

TAKE ACTION »
DONATE »

“As honored as I am to have this legislation in Alisa’s name, I wish more than anything that we didn’t need an Alisa’s Law, or a Leandra’s Law in New York, or an Emma’s Law in South Carolina, or a Melanie’s Law in Massachusetts – or any more laws to stop this needless and 100% preventable crime.”

– Jan Withers, MADD National President


MADD Statement on Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg’s DWI
By | August 19, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

MADD supports government officials, regardless of political affiliation, who take drunk driving seriously. At the same time, we are dismayed each time we hear someone has made the choice to drive drunk – especially those we hold to a higher standard, such as elected officials. Drunk driving is 100% preventable and completely unacceptable, no matter the person behind the wheel, their profession or political party. 

In the specific case involving Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg, MADD Texas publicly expressed disappointment with her actions, and we are grateful that no one was injured or killed. We reiterate that sentiment in light of recent events. Following her sentence, Mrs. Lehmberg offered a monetary donation to MADD Texas, which was accepted and used specifically to serve victims of drunk driving in Texas.

Just like last year's events now being re-played in the media, we want to steer clear of the politics and focus the story on the importance of making the safe choice to designate a non-drinking driver if alcohol is involved.


The U.S Widely Opposes Lowering Drinking Age
By | August 13, 2014 | Filed in: Underage Drinking , Power of Parents

According to a new poll released by Gallup, 74 percent of Americans are against lowering the drinking age to 18 while only 25 percent would favor it.


  Graph from gallup.com


At MADD, we support the 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age law because it prevents tragedies—decreasing crashes by an estimated sixteen percent and saving more than 25,000 lives. Click here to read more reasons why 21 saves lives. 

Sign up for our legislative alerts, and we’ll let you know when legislation to lower the drinking age is introduced in your state.

To learn more about the current 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age law, click here, and to read the full report from this poll, click here.


It Takes a Village
By | August 12, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

Originally featured in the 2014 summer edition of MADDvocate®.

Walk Like MADD

MADD volunteers Bob and Kaye Walsh and Heather Geronemus are unstoppable. When it comes to organizing successful Walk Like MADD community fundraisers, they work like mad. The three agree it takes a village—committed volunteers, generous sponsors, walking and running enthusiasts, and a passion for saving lives—to get the job done.

Virginia Beach

In 1997, after their daughter Robin was killed by a repeat drunk driver, it took some time before Bob and Kaye would consider volunteering for MADD. Seven years later, they decided that they were ready and began speaking at MADD Victim Impact Panels (VIPs).

“Talking about Robin really helped.” Kaye says about her daughter. “If we changed one mind about drinking and driving, then it was worth our time.”

By 2010, this dynamic duo had shared their compelling message with thousands of Navy military personnel, high school and college students, and citizens of Virginia Beach. They’d spent countless hours answering the calls of victims.

Read more.

Fort Lauderdale

After observing a Walk Like MADD event in South Florida, it was no surprise when MADD volunteer and public relations professional Heather Geronemus was asked to chair Fort Lauderdale’s Walk the next year. With a successful track record in organizing fundraisers for other charities in the Fort Lauderdale/Miami area, Heather had some innovative ideas.

“We needed to change it up,” Heather says. That meant including a 5k run called the MADD Dash. And getting corporate sponsors involved. “We created a 5k run component, which attracts a lot of people because we have a robust running community. Our Walk event has something for everyone: runners, walkers, kids, award sfor the fastest runs and more,” Heather says. “MADD is here for everyone!”

When her father, Dr. Robert Geronemus, was struck and killed by a hit-and-run drunk driver in 2009, Heather wanted to do something to honor him. Organizing a MADD fundraiser in their hometown was the perfect fit.

Read more.

 


Delaware Governor Signs All-Offender Interlock Law
By | August 7, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

Yesterday, Delaware Governor Jack Markell signed into law a bill that will protect families in Delaware by reducing drunk driving deaths.

The new law requires all drunk drivers convicted with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or greater to use an ignition interlock on their vehicle for at least four months. Offenders with a BAC of .15 or greater or who are repeat offenders would be required to go on the interlock for a longer period.

Previously, interlock devices were required only for first offenders arrested with a blood-alcohol concentration of .15 or higher or who refused to take a chemical test, and for repeat drunk drivers.

When MADD launched the Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving® in 2006 only one state, New Mexico, had interlock legislation for all offenders. Delaware joins Alabama, Mississippi, and New Hampshire, which also passed lifesaving legislation requiring ignition interlocks for all convicted drunk driving offenders this year, bringing the total number of states with mandatory interlock laws to 24.

Similar laws enacted in other states have helped reduce drunk driving deaths. Since Arizona and Oregon implemented their interlock law, drunk driving deaths have decreased by 43 and 42 percent respectively. MADD has made ignition interlocks for all offenders our number one legislative priority because these devices save lives.

MADD applauds the leadership of Representatives Keeley and Smyk and Senate Majority Leader McBride, as well as all Delaware legislators for passing this lifesaving legislation.

For more information on interlocks, please visit www.madd.org/interlock

Delaware Governor Jack Markell signs HB-212 into law at AAA Mid-Atlantic’s Wilmington, Del. headquarters.  From left to right:  Jamie Nutter, Parkowski, Guerke & Swayze, P.A.; bill sponsor, Representative Helene M. Keeley, (D-3 Wilmington); Debbie Weir, CEO, MADD; Sharon W. Bryson, Deputy Director, NTSB; Marke Dickinson, Executive Vice President, AAA Mid-Atlantic; and Jack Dalton, Director at Coalition of Ignition Interlock Manufacturers

 


Are You Ready for Back to School?
By | August 6, 2014 | Filed in: Underage Drinking , Power of Parents

Summer is drawing to an end, and kids are headed back to school (whether they like it or not). But parents, do you have the supplies you need to make this a successful school year? No, we’re not talking about backpacks and pencils.We’re talking about the tools every parent needs to keep their kids safe.

Did you know alcohol kills more teens than all other drugs combined? That’s why it is so important to talk with your teens about underage drinking. But we know that this can seem like a daunting task, which is why we created the Power of Parents® program to provide parents with proven tips and tools tohelp your kidsstay alcohol-free this school year.

Here are seven tips for getting through to your teen:

  1. Communicate before a problem starts – Have important discussions now, before there’s blame, anger or punishment. Agree on a time to start talking together about the dangers of alcohol.
  2. Discuss rules and consequences – Explain how you expect your son or daughter to act, and why. Tell your teen plainly that you don’t want him or her drinking. Agree on consequences of broken rules.
  3. Show you care – Gently touch your teen on the arm or back to show affection. Tell your teen you love them and want them to be healthy and safe. Explain that’s why you need to talk together about the dangers of underage drinking.
  4. Pay attention – Even when life gets hectic, take time out to listen to your teen. Monitor where your teen is and what your teen is doing.
  5. Share family activities – Have dinner together at least three times a week.
  6. Give and get respect – When your teen talks to you, listen and reply respectfully. Insist that your teen treat you with respect, too.
  7. Enforce consequences consistently – If your teen breaks the rules, stay calm and enforce the consequences.

Click here to get the PDF version of Seven Tips for Connecting with your Teens, as well as helpful conversation starters.

Want to learn more? Get our Parent Handbook for a detailed guide on talking to your teen about alcohol, and our Power of You(th) booklet to help teens take a stand against underage drinking.


2014 Campaign Success
By | August 5, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

All of your efforts to help save lives are working! Thanks to your support, we have had a very successful year so far getting new legislation passed to help protect our loved ones from drunk driving. 

Four states – Alabama, Mississippi, New Hampshire and Delaware – have passed all offender ignition interlock laws this year! In addition, laws requiring interlocks for first-time offenders with a  BAC of .15 or higher were passed in South Carolina and in Rhode Island.

In Kansas, you helped us get the sunset clause on their current interlock law eliminated, which will means interlocks for all offenders will be a permanent law in Kansas. In West Virginia, your efforts helped pass a new law that strengthened the states’ all offender law and closed some administrative and technical loopholes. And finally, in Connecticut, together we got a new law passed that makes the state truly all offender.

And we’re not done yet. We are still working hard in several other states to get laws passed this year, including New Jersey, Ohio, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania.  If you live in one of these states, click here to email your lawmakers in support of lifesaving interlock legislation.

The passage of ignition interlock laws is a key element of MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving®. Requiring all convicted drunk drivers to use ignition interlocks to prove they are sober before they can start their vehicles has been shown to save lives and stop drunk driving. Click here to learn more about ignition interlocks.

Kudos for all of your efforts to help save lives and eliminate drunk driving. We are now one step closer to our vision of a nation without drunk driving!


Why We’re Here: Angie Bass and Zack Davis
By | August 4, 2014 | Filed in: Victim Stories

August 9, 2002 was supposed to be a special day for 27-year-old Angie Bass. She was recently married and was looking forward to celebrating her honeymoon that night. On her way to drop off her son Zack at school, a drunk driver traveling at 85 miles per hour crashed into their car, leaving Angie and Zack in critical condition.  The following day, seven-year-old Zack died from his injuries.

The driver, a repeat offender with a BAC of 0.17 and also under the influence of both prescription and illicit drugs, proceeded to hit a second car before his truck came to a stop in the embankment. He was convicted of 2nd degree murder and two counts of assault with a deadly weapon.  He sustained no major injuries from the crash.

Although Angie survived her injuries, she carries the burden of physical and emotional pain every day. “There is no greater loss than the loss of a loved one,” she says, “Zack was an extraordinary child.”

Zack was a loving and fearless child, and was very smart for his age. He loved to play soccer and had dreams of becoming a fireman or artist. Angie says, “He made every single day a wonderful day to treasure and had a way of making everyone around him feel special.”

After the crash, MADD provided victim services to Angie and her family, including assistance navigating the legal system, as well as court accompaniment during the trial and supportive literature that she credits for helping her learn to cope with the tragedy.

Today, Angie and many other members of Zack’s family are still a part of MADD. They attend local MADD events like victim support groups and victim tributes. Angie continues to help spread awareness of the dangers of drunk and drugged driving by sharing her personal experience. “I would share my story a million times in the hopes of saving one life the pain that my family and I endure,” she says.


CARCHEX Grand Opening Celebration Benefits MADD
By | August 1, 2014 | Filed in: General

MADD was honored to participate in our partners at CARCHEX’s Grand Opening last month, which raised $2,000 for MADD. This donation goes towards their larger national partnership donation of $20,000 pledged earlier this year when MADD and CARCHEX formally became partners to support MADD’s mission.

The Grand Opening celebration took place on June 28th at CARCHEX's new headquarters in the Hunt Valley Towne Centre in Maryland. The Baltimore Ravens' Justin Tucker and Jimmy Smith were on site to sign autographs and take red-carpet style photos with fans. The Grand Opening also coincided with a special gathering of automotive enthusiasts where exotic, classic and muscle cars, trucks and SUVs were on display for the audience's enjoyment.

MADD National President Jan Withers attended the event to share MADD’s mission as well as her personal story.

Baltimore Ravens' Justin Tucker and Jimmy Smith

Fans enjoyed a showcase of specialty vehicles, including McLaren and Lamborghini models.


"Our Grand Opening celebration was a tremendous success. We want to thank all of our partners, friends, and especially the Baltimore Ravens for their support," said Jason Goldsmith, CARCHEX CEO. "With their help, we were able to raise money that will go directly to a cause close to our hearts, MADD's mission to end drunk driving."

Thank you CARCHEX for supporting MADD and for inviting us to participate in your Grand Opening celebration! And thank you to everyone who participated in this event and helped support MADD!

Click here to learn more about our partnership with CARCHEX.


Effects of Alcohol Ads on our Teens
By | July 31, 2014 | Filed in: Underage Drinking , Power of Parents

A study published in the July 2014 issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs revealed that the brands of alcohol popular among underage drinkers are the same ones most heavily advertised in magazines read by youth. The findings provide further evidence that alcohol ads can encourage young people to drink.

The researchers looked at alcohol ads that ran in U.S. magazines in 2011, with a focus on ads for the top 25 alcohol brands consumed by underage drinkers. Those brands were advertised more heavily in magazines read by young people than 308 other alcohol brands that are less popular with underage drinkers, the investigators found.

Compared to the other brands, the most popular brands were five to nine times more likely to heavily expose 18- to 20-year-olds to their magazine ads, the findings showed.

Because of the dangers associated with underage drinking, MADD is concerned about the effects that alcohol advertisements have on our youth.

All of the ads in the study were in complete compliance with the industry’s self-regulatory guidelines, which suggest that alcohol ads should be restricted to magazines with less than 30 percent of readers who are younger than 21.  However, MADD believes in stricter standards, including prohibiting advertising to audiences with less than 90 percent adults aged 21 and older viewership.

Since parents cannot always control the type of advertisements their teens are exposed to, it is important to talk with your teens early and often about the dangers of underage drinking. MADD’s Power of Parents® program can provide the tools you need to start this potentially lifesaving conversation with your teen.  

Click here to download our free Parent Handbook.


Coping with Career-Changing Injuries
By | July 24, 2014 | Filed in: Victim Services , Drunk Driving

Originally featured in the 2014 summer edition of MADDvocate®.

Every 90 seconds, someone is injured in a drunk driving crash. And as we know, first there’s the crash, then the lifelong impact. No one should try to minimize the challenge of adjusting to a new future or letting go of an old life. The reality is that many injured victims must build new lives, and often that includes a new career.

Courageous injured victims Brittany Kirby and Chris Mann share how they successfully rebuilt their lives and their careers—one painful step at a time.

Bad Things Happen to Good People

On February 13, 2009, 19-year-old Brittany, her friend Rachel, and Rachel’s two young children were driving out of town for a Valentine’s Day weekend getaway. Without warning, a drunk driver with a BAC of .15 crossed the center lane of the Tennessee road they were traveling on, and hit their car head-on.

“I don’t remember the crash,” Brittany says. “My injuries included two shattered bones in my left arm, a shattered knee joint and a traumatic brain injury. I was on life support because of my brain injury and I had to undergo eight surgeries.”

Brittany was told that Rachel was in a medically induced coma to help her body heal. Rachel died two days later. Her two children survived.

Chris Mann was living his dream of being a law enforcement officer. He spent four successful years with the Lawrence, Kansas, Police Department. While on patrol and training a rookie officer in the early morning hours of January 11, 2002, his life was forever changed.

“We pulled an SUV with no taillights over,” Chris recalls. “It was a routine traffic stop, until I caught the flash of headlights coming toward me. I didn’t have time to move before I was hit.” Chris says he was walking in front of his patrol car when a drunk driver struck the car from behind, pushing the car into him, sending him airborne. “I landed unconscious on the side of the road, 30 feet from where I had been standing.” Miraculously nothing was broken, but the soft tissue damage to his leg was extensive.

After months of physical therapy he tried to go back to work, but his leg could not hold up. When he was removed from active duty, Chris had to contemplate what to do with the rest of his life.

Adjusting to life after an injury and learning to live with new limitations can be extremely frustrating. Injured victims must heal emotionally as well as physically.

Read the rest of this article in the MADDvocate.

Find More Resources

MADD offers brochures for crash victims, in English and Spanish, covering grief and healing, talking to children and teens about death, coping with serious injury, the criminal and civil court system, and more. Click here.


Support the Charitable Automobile Red-Tape Simplification (CARS) Act
By | July 23, 2014 | Filed in: General

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Ask you lawmaker to support the CARS act to help MADD raise critical funding to save lives.

TAKE ACTION NOW »

A new bill that can help MADD raise crucial funding to fulfill our mission was recently introduced, and we need your help to get it passed.

MADD’s vehicle donation program helps raise critical funds to eliminate drunk driving, but past efforts by Congress that were intended to enact strong safeguards to stem fraud and abuse have unintentionally discouraged potential donors. 

According to the IRS, the number of cars donated the first year the new rules took effect dropped by 67 percent. Moreover, the corresponding value of those vehicle donations went down by 77 percent, meaning that donors stopped donating higher value cars that charities derive the greatest revenue. 

The Charitable Automobile Red-Tape Simplification (CARS) Act, bipartisan legislation authored by Representatives Todd Young and Linda Sanchez, was just introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives and would reform IRS rules to give potential donors a fair market value for donating their vehicle to MADD, or any charity that accepts vehicle donations.

Please write your Representative TODAY and ask them to support this important legislation.


July: A Dangerous Month for Teens
By | July 21, 2014 | Filed in: Underage Drinking , Power of Parents

Summer vacation for teens should be a time of fun and relaxation, summer camps and first jobs, volunteering and exploring. Unfortunately, for some, unsupervised time leads to alcohol and drug use.

July is the month when more young people start using alcohol and other substances than any other. On average in July, someone under age 18 begins:

  • Drinking alcohol every eight seconds
  • Smoking cigarettes every 17 seconds
  • Using marijuana every 19 seconds
  • Using inhalants every 47 seconds

This doesn’t even count the 18, 19 and 20 year olds who begin drinking during the month.

That’s the bad news; now the good news. If you are a teen, you should know that even though the risks are highest during the summer, most teens don’t drink. Less than 30 percent of teens have had a drink in the past month. A growing number of teens have decided to be an example for others through the Power of You(th) program

Teens, click here to get our free teen booklet to learn how to take a stand against underage drinking.

If you are a parent, now’s the perfect time to start or renew the conversation with your teen about alcohol. You can learn how to have the conversation about alcohol effectively with our free Power of Parents handbook at www.madd.org/powerofparents.

 

Number of Adolescents Younger than 18 Using Alcohol for the First Time on an Average Day, by Month: 2002 to 2010


The 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age Law Turns 30
By | July 17, 2014 | Filed in: Underage Drinking , Power of Parents

On July 17, 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed the 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age law.

Today, on its 30th anniversary, we celebrate this law, which has saved more than 25,000 lives and continues to prevent senseless tragedies.

Click here to read the history of the 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age law.

The Minimum Legal Drinking Age was set at 21 based on decades of research proving that young people react differently to alcohol. Teens get drunk twice as fast as adults, but have more trouble knowing when to stop. Teens naturally overdo it and binge more often than adults. Enforcing the legal drinking age of 21 reduces traffic crashes, protects young people’s maturing brains, and keeps young people safer overall.

Click here to find out more reasons to support 21.

MADD knows that informed, caring parents can make a difference, and we’re here to help. In fact, data from a national MADD/Nationwide Insurance® survey of high school students shows that teens who receive a message from their parents that underage drinking is completely unacceptable are more than 80 percent less likely to drink than teens who receive any other message. Click here to see the interactive infographic.

So today, in honor of the anniversary of the 21 drinking legal drinking age, we encourage all parents and caregivers to talk with your teens about the dangers of underage drinking. Start by visiting the Power of Parents® page on our website to download the free parent handbook and get other tips and expert resources for talking with your kids about alcohol.

MADD has always, and will continue to support the 21 Minimum Legal Drinking Age because it saves lives and prevents injuries.


Stay Safe on the Road This Summer
By | July 16, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

During the summer months, families often take to the highways for vacations and extended road trips. While these excursions can start off as a happy occasion, they can too often result in tragedy.

A new infographic from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Ad Council shows how even if the drunk driving crash doesn’t kill or seriously injure you, the consequences will still ruin your life.

Safe Summer Driving

Renew Your Commitment to Drunk Driving Prevention
By | July 10, 2014 | Filed in: Drunk Driving

A recent study, released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) about the financial impact of motor vehicle crashes, shows that if drunk driving continues at its present level, an average of two out of three people in the United States will be involved in a drunk driving crash in their lifetime. This is a significant increase over previous data, which estimated that one in three people will be involved.

In light of these concerning new findings, and in an ongoing effort to prevent the devastating consequences of drunk driving, MADD is calling on Americans to renew their commitment to drunk driving prevention this summer.

Take the pledge now.

Other significant drunk driving findings from the study include:

  • The economic impact of drunk driving is second only to speeding.
  • The annual cost of drunk driving in the U.S. is $199 billion, which is up from previous estimates of $132 billion.
  • The number of injuries each year attributed to drunk driving is 290,000, which is down from previous estimates of 345,000 injuries.
  • The number of crashes each year that involve a drunk driver is 2.65 million, which is up from 2.09 million in 2000.

This should serve as a wake-up call. There is no denying the devastating impact of drunk driving on our families, communities, and the country as a whole. Luckily, the solution is simple: just don’t drink and drive. It’s not worth it.

For more information about MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving, visit www.madd.org/campaign.

Click here to add your name to the list of people renewing their commitment to drunk driving prevention.


 

 

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