Voices of Victims - Why We're Here


Voices of Victims

Voices of Victims: Kellie Murphy Wheatley

"We will never forget what a special angel we had in Kellie. Time does not heal and broken hearts are difficult to mend.”

These are the words spoken by George and Marilyn Murphy, the parents of Kellie Murphy Wheatley.

Kellie was a person who always went above and beyond for others, and she could always brighten anyone's day. When asked how Kellie is remembered, Mr. and Mrs. Murphy replied, “Kellie's two sons, her niece, and our two great granddaughters all have so many of Kellie's mannerisms. We are blessed to see Kellie in other members of our family and that will keep Kellie's life alive in our family.”

On July 4, 1984, Kellie, 24, was hit by a drunk driver while riding bikes with her husband Orville and their 14 month-old son Christopher, who was in a carrier on the back of Orville's bike.

The family spent the day enjoying one another's company at a local park in Jacksonville, Illinois. They stopped their bikes alongside a secondary street in South Jacksonville to tuck a blanket Christopher was carrying onto his seat belt. Kellie was concerned it might get caught in the spokes of the bike. As they stood alongside of the city street, they were unaware that an intoxicated driver abruptly turned the corner. The driver hit Kellie and continued to drive down the road, not realizing he struck Kellie with his vehicle.

Kellie died instantly. Orville and Christopher were not injured, and the drunk driver spent seven months in prison for reckless homicide.

Although it has been 32 years since the crash, the Murphy family will always associate July 4th with the day Kellie lost her life because someone chose to drink and drive.



Voices of Victims: Phaedra Marriott Olsen

On Mother's Day weekend, 1996, Phaedra, age 22, a preschool teacher who had also done some modeling on the side, was enjoying a concert with some friends not far from her hometown.  The two car loads of youth who were completely sober were driving home in Morgan County, Missouri, as a misty rain began to fall.  Unbeknownst to them, a drunk driver with a .08 BAC was heading their way as he crossed the center line of Highway 5.  Phaedra's friends in the car in front managed to see him in time to swerve.  The drunk driver clipped them and headed straight for Phaedra's car.  As he topped the hill around a curve, she had no warning and he hit her nearly head-on.

Phaedra's injuries were numerous and life-threatening.  At the hospital, doctors discovered that the impact of the crash had ripped her aortic valve from her heart.  Most people would have died within minutes, but Phaedra had not.  In an emergency surgery to repair it, surgeons struggled to stop the bleeding.  They quickly realized that she would bleed to death on the operating table if something wasn't done immediately.  So, to save her life, they cut off the blood flow to her lower extremities to slow the bleeding enough to make the repairs to her heart.

She spent 3 weeks in a coma and 5 1/2 weeks on life support before waking to learn that the decision to save her life had cost her the ability to walk.  In addition, she also had plates in her arm and both legs due to both ankles, a left femur, and a right forearm being broken.  Her pelvis had been broken on both sides as well as 4 ribs.  Both lungs had collapsed and her liver had been lacerated.  Her gallbladder, appendix, and spleen were damaged and all had to be removed. 

Phaedra's son was 4 years old at the time of the crash.  She missed his first day of kindergarten because she was still in the hospital.  As he grew up, someone else taught him to ride a bike, played in the ocean waves with him, and rode roller coasters with him while she sat on the sidelines and cheered, quietly wishing she could be the one beside him.

In 2000, Phaedra began working for MADD Missouri.  She became a Victim Specialist helping other victims by providing emotional support and guidance through court proceedings.  In 2010, she was crowned Ms. Wheelchair USA, again bringing awareness to the dangers of drunk driving by choosing it as her official platform.  In 2012, she moved to Tennessee as the Underage Drinking Specialist for the MADD Tennessee state office.  She built the program up from a presence that was non-existent to the top program in the country, talking to thousands of teens annually about the dangers of underage drinking and sharing her story with kids, parents, and DUI offenders.



Phaedra's original scars may have healed, but the impact of a DUI crash lasts for a lifetime.  With no spleen, Phaedra is more susceptible to illness and her immune system is unable to fight simple infections.  An ear infection can end up in a hospital stay.  Independent and resolute, Phaedra drives, works full time, and is now the mother to an 8 year old daughter, as well as her grown son and step-daughter.  People are amazed at how she lifts her wheelchair overhead, in and out of her car, and is not deterred from anything she sets her mind to doing.  However, her determination takes its toll on her body.  She recently had to have surgery on her arm because a problem with one of the plates had caused a fracture in her arm.  Because she is constantly lifting her chair and transferring herself in and out of it, the injury to her arm caused a significant hardship on her ability to proceed with life as normal.  And because of her immunity problem, the healing process was also complicated.

But those who know Phaedra, know that despite the lifelong affect drunk driving has had on her life, the thing that stands out most about her is her positive attitude.  She never waivers.  For years, she has fought to serve others who have been impacted by the crimes of drunk and drugged driving and underage drinking and to spread awareness about their dangers by sharing her story.  She is an inspiration to all!  And she will continue to fight until MADD fulfills it's vision of No More Victims!


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