Today, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) released a report focusing on “high risk” drunk drivers. MADD has issued the following response:

ALL drunk drivers are high risk. The alcohol industry funded the GHSA report to distract from that undeniable fact and it is damaging to efforts nationwide to eliminate the No. 1 killer on America’s roads. According to the CDC, the average drunk driver has driven drunk 80 times before getting caught, and a first-time drunk driver with a .08 BAC is just as dangerous as a driver with a higher BAC. Classifying drunk drivers as “high-risk” or “hard core” is a tired debate that was settled years ago by a 2006 Insurance Institute for Highway Safety report: “… the hard-core group isn’t the whole DWI problem or even the biggest part, so it doesn’t make sense to focus too narrowly on this group. The result is to overlook a lot of other impaired drivers who escape the definition of hard core.” It will take all of us to stop these tragedies by supporting law enforcement, advocating for ignition interlocks for all drunk drivers (in addition to any treatment deemed necessary), and passing federal legislation to require all new vehicles be equipped with drunk driving prevention technology.

About Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Founded in 1980 by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving® (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to end drunk driving, help fight drugged driving, support the victims of these violent crimes and prevent underage drinking. MADD has helped to more than 390,000 lives, reduce drunk driving deaths by more than 50 percent and promote designating a non-drinking driver. MADD’s Campaign to Eliminate Drunk Driving® calls for law enforcement support, ignition interlocks for all offenders and advanced vehicle technology. MADD has provided supportive services to nearly one million drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge through local victim advocates and the 24-Hour Victim Help Line 1-877-MADD-HELP. Visit www.madd.org or call 1-877-ASK-MADD.